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Reforming the Mental Healthcare System

Mental health has been in the news a lot recently, mostly for the wrong reasons. What is most disturbing is how some commentators are using the recent mass shootings as evidence to further stigmatize mental illness. While they talk about reforming a broken mental health care system, what they are actually promoting is institutionalization for individuals with severe and persistent mental illness. This is unacceptable and distracts policy-makers from the fundamental issue; our current mental health care system is broken, underfunded and often criminalizes mental illness.

Why do we allow society to blame those who suffer from these devastating illnesses when they are the victims? It is no secret that even the best evidence-based treatments are still not good enough. Yet, they represent the latest research and should be widely available to patients. Sadly this is not the case. Community mental health centers are underfunded and lack the resources to offer such treatments. Training is expensive and access is limited. Insurance companies frequently balk at paying for treatment that they argue is questionable from an efficacy standpoint. The complexity of the mental health system, divergent opinions about treatment, and limited access to care often leaves family and patients confused, frustrated and marginalized. It is not exaggerating when people say the mental health system is broken and in crisis.

So what can be done? To start, our leaders need to stop using these isolated incidents of violence as evidence to support changes in the mental health system. However well meaning, it sends the wrong message and ultimately does more harm that good. Secondly, the government needs to get out of the way and let those who understand mental health care take the lead. There is far too much bureaucracy and inefficiency in the system (the current government shutdown an outstanding example). We need congress to appropriate funding at a level that meets the current needs of the system, without any stipulations or interference from special interest groups. Appoint a director to oversee a complete reformation of the system who is given the authority to implement the necessary changes (versus the usual congressional route of asking for a report that never goes anywhere). The director should bring together the National Institute of Mental Health, the Veterans Administration, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, the National Alliance on Mental Illness, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services, as well as various research and provider stakeholders to develop a comprehensive plan that aligns research, training, advocacy and treatment objectives on a national level. Simplify the process for accessing care and reduce the administrative burdens associated with providing mental health care. Stop kowtowing to special interest groups and make mental health parity a reality. Create a national standard for reducing the criminalization of mental illness through the use of mental health courts and mandated treatment for those most at risk for violence. Ensure that there is adequate access to various levels of care nation-wide. Prioritize the implementation of electronic medical records that allow for seamless communication between providers. Provide funding for training providers that includes national standards for graduate programs and licensing. Revamp psychiatric training programs to ensure that psychiatrists are thoroughly trained in psychotherapy as well as psychopharmacology. Mandate that insurance companies reimburse for psychiatrists who provide psychotherapy. Provide incentives for the development of novel treatments, including medications.

This is a daunting list and incomplete. Critics may call such a proposal idealistic, too expensive and unworkable. However, what other options do we have? The patchwork approach has not proven effective and there is little evidence that leaving the process in the hands of a partisan congress will produce acceptable results. Overhauling the mental health care system can only be effective if there is a comprehensive, long-term vision that aligns research, treatment, training and advocacy objectives. It will be difficult and expensive, but those who suffer from severe and persistent mental illness deserve our best effort.

North Conway, NH Eating Disorder Support Group

Eating Disorders Support Group

An intimate group designed to receive support, learn coping skills, and find strategies to overcome an eating disorder.

Brought to you by local professionals, dedicated to helping people recover from their eating disorders. The group is open to individuals, 18 years or older, who are working towards recovery from their eating disorder.

Topics include:
• Learn new skills for overcoming disordered eating behaviors
• Find out how to start changing your mindset
• Discover new self-help strategies
• Enhance your support network

Location: Reporter Court, North Conway, NH

Cost: $40 for a 4-week series

Please call 603.319.4512 or email: info@ascentcounselingnh.com for more information.

A bit about the clinicians…
• Nick Hudson-Swogger: Nick has an MA in Counseling from the University of New Hampshire and is currently pursuing a certificate in advance graduate studies from the Eating Disorder Institute at Plymouth State University. He is a trained DBT and FBT therapist and member of the Academy of Eating Disorders.
• Hope Patterson, Nutritionist & Wellness Coach: Hope is dedicated to eating disorder recovery by teaching her clients new eating strategies for their everyday life. Hope has a degree in dietetics from Simmons College and an M.Ed in Health Promotion from Plymouth State University, focusing on eating disorder recovery.
• Christine Wallace: Christine has a psychology degree from Salem State and an MS in mental health counseling from Nova South Eastern University. She also is a Ph.D-abd in metaphysical science. Christine currently practices privately in North Conway, NH, treating anxiety, depression, and addiction.

I Am One of the 26 Percent

If you read the Concord Monitor, or are involved with NAMI NH, you probably have kept up on the series of articles over the past few years about the crisis within the NH Mental Health system. A number of these articles were written by a staff writer named Annemarie Timmins. She just published an article today called “I Am One of the 26 Percent” in which she has bravely discloses her own struggles with mental illness. It is a very powerful article, and a reminder that the majority of people who struggle with mental illness do not fit the stereotype many people imagine. I am including the links to all the articles from the Concord Monitor series – they are worth the read. One more reminder that as a society, we need to rethink our approach to mental health care.

A Four-Day Focus on the State Troubled Mental Health System
Mentally Ill Patients Face Spartan Conditions – Long Delays in NH
New Hampshires Mental Health System – From Leader to Failure
Community-Level Care is Key to Help Patients Return Home
Mental Health Court Gives Offenders Treatment – Not Time
In Crisis – Future Uncertain for Mental Health Care in NH
That’s Not the Kind of State We Are – Why NH Needs to Fix Mental Health Care Now

Eating Disorder News

Just a few eating disorder-related news items to pass along in this post. The first is that a parental education law was just passed in Virginia. If you haven’t heard about the controversy regarding the new Victoria Secret “Bright Young Things” product line that targets young teens, I recommend you read this and this. While eating disorders are certainly biologically based brain disorders, there is no doubt that cultural influences that perpetuate the thin ideal contribute to these illnesses. I hope that pressure can be put on Victoria Secret to end this product line. On a more positive note, there was a nice article on CNN recently about a woman who recovered from her eating disorder. While we still have a long way to go in developing effective treatments for eating disorders, one fact that research has shown is that if you intervene when an eating disorder first presents, and are able to treat it effectively, the risk of relapse decreases significantly. That is why programs such as the one being developed in Virginia are so important. The earlier we identify and treat these illnesses, the better chance they will not become chronic conditions. I hope that we see similar legislation in New Hampshire in the near future.