American Psychiatric Association

Thoughts About DSM-5

As I discussed in a previous post, there has been much controversy about the DSM-5. Now that it has been released and people have a chance to review it, I think we can all take a deep breath. I do not believe that the changes to the manual are as dramatic or controversial as I think people were expecting. There are changes that may be disliked by some (such as the consolidation of Autism, Aspergers and Pervasive Developmental Disorder NOS), but one the whole, I think the APA did their best to find a balance in the changes they made. I doubt that most clinicians (or journalists for that matter) bother to read all the fine print in the introduction, but I recommend that they do. For one, the authors readily acknowledge the limitations of the current categorical system and splitting of disorders.

“The historical aspiration of achieving diagnostic homogeneity by progressive subtyping within disorder categories no longer is sensible; like most common human ills, mental disorders are heterogeneous at many levels ranging from genetic risk factors to symptoms (APA, p. 12).”

Further on they outline some of the problems with trying to diagnose a mental disorder based upon a categorical system:

“…it is not sufficient to simply check off the symptoms in the diagnostic criteria to make a mental disorder…it is well recognized that this set of categorical diagnoses does not fully describe the full range of mental disorders that individuals experience and present to clinicians on a daily basis throughout the world (APA, p. 19).”

The inclusion of dimensional measures of symptom severity that cuts across diagnostic category is a good start. I am pleased with the inclusion of assessment tools in the manual, as well as their availability online. I hope that this pushes more clinicians to include the use of standardized assessment tools in their daily practice.

One argument about DSM-5 that I have heard is this notion that it has pathologized normal behavior by expanding what constitutes a mental disorder. There is some merit to this concern, especially if you just read the names of the disorders and their respective diagnostic criteria. However, there are very clear cautionary statements included in DSM-5 (and previously in DSM-IV) about this very issue. A core feature of what defines a mental disorder is the concept of “clinical impairment”, or how the symptoms negatively affect an individual’s functioning in daily life. This can be a challenging question to answer, especially if the symptoms and/or impairment are not recognized by the individual (such as in the case of psychosis). In DSM-IV, clinicians used the Global Assessment of Function scale (or GAF as it is commonly referred to) as a means of quantifying impairment. In truth, the GAF was a very ineffective means of quantifying impairment, as the authors of the DSM-5 readily acknowledge:

“It was recommended that the GAF be dropped from DSM-5 for several reasons, including its conceptual lack of clarity (i.e., including symptoms, suicide risk and disabilities in its descriptions) and questionable psychometrics in routine practice (APA, p. 16).”

Instead, the DSM-5 recommends using the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 (WHODAS). While it requires a bit more effort that the GAF, I believe it does a better job of capturing and quantifying this concept of “clinical impairment.”

One of the underlying problems with DSM-5 is less to do with the manual, and more to do with how it is viewed by both clinicians and the general public. I often hear people call the DSM the “bible” of psychological disorders. This is a most unfortunate term for several reasons. First, the word bible has obvious religious and cultural connotations that suggest the book is somehow sacred and immutable. The truth is the DSM is anything but; it is a living document, based on current research and always open to having the contents challenged and modified by new discoveries.

As stated by the book itself, “Diagnostic criteria are offered as guidelines (my emphasis) for making diagnoses, and their use should be informed by clinical judgment (APA, p. 21).”

The DSM is not the last word when it comes to diagnosing mental disorders. The diagnoses are simply the best way at present of understanding a set of symptoms. I always caution clients not to focus too much on what diagnosis they are given. While it is true that a diagnosis can help inform treatment, it is far more valuable to focus on the particular set of symptoms that are present and the suffering that comes with them. Ultimately, mental health treatment is about relieving suffering and not a diagnostic name. So while the new edition of the DSM is certainly interesting and important, it is only one facet of mental health treatment, and not the most important one at that.

Bibliography

American Psychiatric Association (2013). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Fifth Edition. Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Publishing.